Biointerfaces

Surfaces covered and functionalized with biomolecules play a key role in nano-biotechnology. At NANOTEC we study the biomolecules at interfaces with high resolution techniques to elucidate the mechanisms of self-assembly and aggregation, investigate the molecular-scale mechanisms of surface force generation and determine the mechanical and viscoelastic properties of biomaterials for their applications in tissue regeneration and biosensing.

Proteins at interfaces

Protein and peptide monolayers/multilayers are created at a liquid/vapour interface by Langmuir techniques. Studies on the aggregation process are performed in situ by the analysis of the compression isotherm curves, obtained under different environmental conditions (T, pH, compression speed), using models derived for classical 3D aggregation, adapted to the 2D world. The structural properties are investigated on mono-layers and multi-layers after the transfer of the film on silicon or glass substrates by Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir-Shaefer techniques, by means of scanning probe Microscopy Nanomechanics and Force spectroscopy. Of particular interest are Hydrophobins, small proteins produced by filamentous fungi, as they are biological surfactants whose films and aggregates can be used as models to study the mechanism of protein aggregation, for instancein amyloidosis. Moreover hydrophobins exhibit singular properties that can be exploited for bio-technological application.

Protein aggregation

Protein aggregation is a process triggered by physical and chemical changes in the surrounding molecular environment that lead to several neurodegenerative human disorders known as amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and spongiform encephalopathies. On the other hand, protein aggregation can also be utilized for creating nanostructured materials as protein can self-assemble in fibrils and other organized orphologies with defined nanoscale morphologies.

Protein structures can be modelled by regulating a number of experimental conditions that include temperature, pH, protein concentration, presence of other compounds and substrate of deposition. The structures formed can be characterized by a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. In our case, we have studied the self-assembly features of model proteins such as ß-lactoglobulin and human serum albumin. Their aggregation properties have been investigated in the presence of metals such as copper, zinc and iron, as well as in interaction with solid substrates.

Model of protein fibrils, classified according to their and periodicity as 1st, 2nd and 3rd type filaments. AFM images of fibrils obtained after incubation at 80 °C of ß-lactoglobulin, either alone or in the presence of increasing amounts of copper ion
Model of protein fibrils, classified according to their and periodicity as 1st, 2nd and 3rd type filaments. AFM images of fibrils obtained after incubation at 80 °C of ß-lactoglobulin, either alone or in the presence of increasing amounts of copper ion

Molecular-scale mechanisms of surface force generation by proteins and biomimetic polymers

There are many examples of biological surfaces that show outstanding lubrication properties (e.g. removal of surface adsorption/adhesion, low friction coefficient and/or high resistance to wear) while exposed to aqueous fluids, e.g. articular cartilage, cornea, teeth, gastro-intestinal and reproductive tracts. Most synthetic lubricants and surface coatings are oil-based and immiscible with water, and fail to provide an efficient or durable lubrication of wet surfaces, which is particularly inconvenient in bioengineering, e.g. for joint replacements, contact lenses, hearth valves, catheters and medical probes. Likewise, synthetic adhesives generally fail to provide efficient surface adhesion in wet conditions whereas many organisms, particularly sea shells, mussel and algae, are able to firmly attach to underwater surfaces. Our project is aimed at clarifying the molecular-scale mechanisms of biological adhesion and lubrication, relating molecular composition to conformation and function, for two classes of proteins: mucin glycoproteins that lubricate many surfaces of the human body, and mussel foot proteins that provide underwater surface adhesion. In both cases, the key molecular feature is the presence of specific functional groups: strongly hydrophilic sugar groups in mucins and surface-binding L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) in mussels.
The study is conducted mainly using the Surface Force Apparatus (SFA) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) on protein layers adsorbed on solid surfaces and functional coatings with known physical-chemical properties (surface charge, polarity, roughness, etc.). Insights into the molecular-scale mechanism of surface adhesion and lubrication can be translated into the molecular structure of biomimetic synthetic polymer, which are also considered in this project.

(a) Sphere-plane confinement geometry is used in SFA and AFM force measurements on proteins and other chain-like molecules. Adhesive groups such as the DOPA in Perna Viridis foot protein (PVFP) create a network of surface bridges. (b) AFM force measurement on a biomimetic adhesive polymer inspired to PVFPs. The small probe radius R ≈ 10 nm is able to resolve single bridge stretching and bond rupture events, and measure the adhesive force F0 and work of adhesion W. (c) SFA with R ≈ 2 cm measures the force generated by a much larger population of molecules. (d) AFM allows imaging single proteins and small aggregates. The image shows mucin molecules adsorbed on a flat surface.
(a) Sphere-plane confinement geometry is used in SFA and AFM force measurements on proteins and other chain-like molecules. Adhesive groups such as the DOPA in Perna Viridis foot protein (PVFP) create a network of surface bridges. (b) AFM force measurement on a biomimetic adhesive polymer inspired to PVFPs. The small probe radius R ≈ 10 nm is able to resolve single bridge stretching and bond rupture events, and measure the adhesive force F0 and work of adhesion W. (c) SFA with R ≈ 2 cm measures the force generated by a much larger population of molecules. (d) AFM allows imaging single proteins and small aggregates. The image shows mucin molecules adsorbed on a flat surface.

Adhesive and viscoelastic properties of biomolecular thin films and biomaterials

This project is focused on the quantitative analysis of the mechanical properties of polymers, protein layers and biological tissues for biomedical applications.
The cornea is the transparent front part of the eye that covers the iris, pupil, and anterior chamber and provides 2/3 of the eye’s focusing power. The cornea has the structure of a thin shell with the external and internal surfaces having an ellipsoidal geometry. In the last three years our research has been focused mainly on the study of the mechanical properties of the corneal stroma using atomic force microscopy. A part of the research was devoted to the study of the effects induced in corneal tissues by the riboflavin/UV-A cross-linking technique, used for the treatment of the corneal disease known as keratoconus. Another part of the research was aimed to study the depth-dependent mechanical anisotropy of the human corneal stroma at the micro- and nano-level and to determine whether the biomechanics of the stroma involves any relationships between different scales of measurement. The research is carried out using Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy.

Biofunctionalization of materials and devices

Biomimetic and bioinspired materials present an emerging field in the areas of biomedicine, bioengineering, and biological science. Of particular interest is the current trend toward the production of biofunctional materials that are able to interact with the surrounding biological environment thereby enabling applications in tissue engineering, therapy, biosensing and bioimaging. In the case of tissue engineering, biomimetically inspired biomaterials include hydrogels, calcium phosphates (CaP) like hydroxyapatite (HA), magnesium containing coatings and materials containing proteins or peptides of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Low pressure and atmospheric pressure, plasma-assisted approaches can be used in order to improve the attachment of biomolecules onto materials, promote the adsorption of microcarriers to deliver a specific biomolecule (i.e. growth factors or bioactive agents) or plasma deposit in a single step coatings containing the molecules of interest that mimick the ECM environment or coatings containing magnesium and/or hydroxyapatite.

Fluorescence microscopy of SAOS 2 cells grown on PCL scaffold before (native, left) and after (100%H2_Mg, right) plasma sputtering deposition of a Mg-containing coating aimed to release Mg2+ and OH- ions.
Fluorescence microscopy of SAOS 2 cells grown on PCL scaffold before (native, left) and after (100%H2_Mg, right) plasma sputtering deposition of a Mg-containing coating aimed to release Mg2+ and OH- ions.

Facilities & Labs

Micro/nano fabrication @ Rende

Bio lab @ Rende

Structural and morphological characterizations lab @ Rende

Plasma Technologies Lab @ URT Bari

Chemical-Structural Characterization Lab @ URT Bari

Bio Lab @ URT Bari

People

michel giocondoMichele

Giocondo

CNR Researcher

PaoloFrancesco_AmbricoPaolo Francesco

Ambrico

Eloisa_SardellaEloisa

Sardella

CNR Researcher

Bruno_RizzutiBruno

Rizzuti

CNR Researcher

Pasquale_PagliusiPasquale

Pagliusi

Associate Professor

Bruno_ZapponeBruno

Zappone

CNR Researcher

MariaPenelope_DeSantoMaria P.

De Santo

Associate Resercher

Riccardo_BarbieriRiccardo

Barberi

Associate Professor

Pietro-FaviaPietro

Favia

Associate Professor

Roberto_GristinaRoberto

Gristina

CNR Researcher

fabio_palumbor150Fabio

Palumbo

CNR Researcher

Federica_ciuchiFederica

Ciuchi

CNR Researcher

Publications

  1. L. Petrone, A. Kumar, C. N. Sutanto, N. J. Patil, S. Kannan, A. Palaniappan, S. Amini, B. Zappone, C. Verma and A. Miserez, Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins, Nature Communications  6, 8737 (2015) ISSN: 2041-1723; doi: 10.1038/ncomms9737
  2. B. Zappone, N. Patil, J. Madsen, K. Pakkanen, S. Lee, Molecular Structure and Equilibrium Forces of Bovine Submaxillary Mucin Adsorbed at a Solid-Liquid Interface Langmuir, 31 (15), 4524-4533 (2015) ISSN: 0743-7463; doi: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b00548
  3. R. Guzzi, B. Rizzuti, C. Labate, B. Zappone, M.P. De Santo, Ferric ions inhibit the amyloid fibrillation of ß-lactoglobulin at high temperature, Biomacromolecules, 16, 1794-1801 (2015). ISSN: 1525-7797; doi: 10.1021/acs.biomac.5b00371
  4. C. Labate, M.P. De Santo, G. Lombardo, M. Lombardo, Understanding Of The Viscoelastic Response Of The Human Corneal Stroma Induced By Riboflavin/Uv-A Cross-Linking At The Nano Level, Plos One, 10, 4 pag UNSP e0122868 (2015), ISSN: 1932-6203 doi: 10.1371/Journal.Pone.0122868
  5. C. Labate, M. Lombardo, M. P. De Santo, J. Dias. N.M. Ziebarth, G. Lombardo, Multiscale Investigation Of The Depth-Dependent Mechanical Anisotropy Of The Human Corneal Stroma, Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science 56 (6), 4053-60 (2015) ISSN: 0146-0404;doi: 10.1167/Iovs.15-16875.
  6. T. Røn, I. Javakhishvili, N. J. Patil; K. Jankova Atanasova, B. Zappone, S. Hvilsted, S. Lee, Aqueous lubricating properties of charged (ABC) and neutral (ABA) triblock copolymer chains Polymer 55, 4873–4883 (2014). ISSN: 0032-3861; doi: 10.1016/j.polymer.2014.07.049
  7. G. Da Ponte, E. Sardella, F. Fanelli, S. Paulussen, P. Favia. Atmospheric pressure plasma deposition of poly lactic acid-like coatings with embedded elastin. Plasma processes and polymers 11-4 (2014) 342-352 ISSN: 1612-8850; doi: 10.1002/ppap.201300130

Other selected publications

  1. Houmadi, R.D. Rodriguez, S. Longobardi, P. Giardina, M. C. Fauré, M. Giocondo, E. Lacaze, Self-Assembly of Hydrophobin Protein Rodlets Studied with Atomic Force Spectroscopy in Dynamic Mode Langmuir 28(5), 2551-2557 (2012). ISSN: 0743-7463; doi: 10.1021/la2028093
  2. De Stefano, I. Rea, E. De Tommasi, I. Rendina, L. Rotiroti, M. Giocondo, S. Longobardi, A. Armenante, and P. Giardina. Bioactive Modification of Silicon Surface using Self-assembled Hydrophobins from Pleurotus ostreatusEPJ E-Soft Matter & Biological Physics, 30(2), 181-185 (2009) ISSN: 1292-8941; doi: 10.1140/epje/i2009-10481-y
  3. Houmadi, F. Ciuchi, M.P. De Santo, L. De Stefano, I. Rea, P. Giardina, A. Armenante, E. Lacaze and M. Giocondo. Langmuir-Blodgett film of hydrophobin protein from Pleurotus ostreatus at the air-water interfaceLangmuir, 24(22), 12953–12957, (2008). ISSN: 0743-7463; doi: 10.1021/la802306r
  4. De Stefano, I.  Rea, A. Armenante, I. Rendina,  P. Giardina and  M. Giocondo. Self-Assembled Biofilm of Hydrophobins Protect the Silicon Surface in the KOH Wet Etch Process, Langmuir 23(15) 7920 (2007) ISSN: 0743-7463; doi: 10.1021/la701189b
  5. Das; X. Banquy; B. Zappone; G. W. Greene; G. Jay; J. Israelachvili , Synergistic interactions between grafted Hyaluronic acid and Lubricin provide enhanced wear protection and lubrication, Biomacromolecules 14, 1669–1677 (2013). ISSN: 1525-7797; doi: 10.1021/bm400327a
  6. Zappone, P. J. Thurner, J. Adams, G. E. Fantner, P. K. Hansma, Effect of Ca2+ ions on the adhesion and mechanical properties of adsorbed layers of human Osteopontin, Biophysical Journal, 95,  1-12 (2008). ISSN: 0006-3495; doi: 10.1529/biophysj.108.135889
  7. Zappone, G. W. Greene, E. Ouroudjev, G. D. Jay, J. N. Israelachvili, Molecular aspects of the boundary lubrication by human Lubricin: effect of disulphide bonds and enzymatic digestion, Langmuir 24, 1495-1508 (2008). ISSN: 0743-7463; doi: 10.1021/la702383n
  8. Zappone, M. Ruths, G. W. Greene, G. D. Jay, J. N. Israelachvili, Adsorption, lubrication and wear of Lubricin on model surfaces: Polymer brush-like behavior of a glycoprotein, Biophysical Journal 92, 1693-1708 (2007). ISSN: 0006-3495; doi: 10.1529/biophysj.106.088799
  9. Lombardo M, Lombardo G, Carbone G, De Santo Mp, Barberi R, Serrao S, Biomechanics Of The Anterior Human Corneal Tissue Investigated With Atomic Force Microscopy. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 53, 1050-1057 (2012) ISSN: 0146-0404; doi: 10.1167/iovs.11-8720
  10. Lombardo M, Carbone G, Lombardo G, De Santo Mp, Barberi R, Analysis Of Intraocular Lens Surface Adhesiveness By Atomic Force Microscopy, Journal Of Cataract And Refractive Surgery, 35, 1266-1272 (2009) ISSN: 0886-335; doi: 10.1016/j.jcrs.2009.02.0290

Project

  1. PRIN 2010–2011 (PROxi project).
  2. Laboratorio SISTEMA – Laboratorio per lo Sviluppo Integrato delle Scienze e delle TEcnologie dei Materiali Avanzati e per dispositivi innovativi; Potenziamento Strutturale PONa3_00369 , (2012 – 2014)

Latest News

Disordered serendipity: a glassy path to discovery

A workshop in honour of Giorgio Parisi’s 70th birthday

September 19-21, 2018 - Roma

Sapienza University

With the occasion of celebrating Giorgio Parisi 70th birthday, the conference "Disordered serendipity: a glassy path to discovery" brings to Rome many among the world-leading experts in the field of complex systems. In order to properly represent the many fields of research where Giorgio Parisi gave a relevant contribution in his studies of disordered systems, the conference covers a broad spectrum of topics: from  fundamental and rigorous analysis of the statistical mechanics of disorder systems to applications in biology and computer science. These subjects are deeply interconnected since they are characterized by the presence of glassy behavior.

 

https://sites.google.com/site/disorderedserendipity/

Il prof. Giorgio Parisi eletto presidente dell'Accademia dei Lincei

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La più antica accademia del mondo ha un nuovo Presidente

Roma, 22 Giugno 2018

Siamo lieti di annunciare che il prof Giorgio Parisi, fisico della Università La Sapienza di Roma e Associato Cnr Nanotec, è il nuovo Presidente dell'Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei. A lui le nostre più vive congratulazioni e gli auguri di buon lavoro.

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Costituzione del nuovo Ispc-Cnr

IV incontro - nuovo Istituto di Scienze del Patrimonio Culturale - CNR

Lecce, 20 aprile 2018

Aula Rita Levi Montalcini - ore 11:00

CNR NANOTEC c/o Campus Ecotekne

Per comunicazioni inerenti il processo di riorganizzazione potete scrivere a: infonuovoispc@cnr.it

Tutte le informazioni che riguardano gli incontri, compresi gli indirizzi dello streaming, li trovate sul sito http://www.ispc.cnr.it

Informazioni logistiche: goo.gl/ZieUad