Plasmonic and Metamaterial @ LiCryl

Mission

The group conducts research in the field of innovative, nanostructured materials. On such a scale, light-matter interaction can be tailored in order to reach the desired customization level. In particular, the optical properties of 1D, 2D and 3D nano-resonators are specifically engineered with the aim of experimenting completely new properties and phenomena. As mono-dimensional nanoresonators, the group has an expertise in a new kind of plasmonic crystals, denominated Hyperbolic Metamaterials, whose extreme anisotropy can be designed in order to achieve unprecedented phenomena among which supercollimation, perfect-lensing, extreme resolution bio-sensing, resonant gaining and thermal tunability are only few examples. Within the class of 2D nanoresonators, the group investigates the properties of a particular class of photonic meta-structures calld Photonic Quasi-Crystals (PQCs). Due to their specific arrangement, PQCs shows special optical features like extraordinary transmission. The thermal properties of metallic nano-spheres are investigated in order to engineer their thermo-plasmonic properties. With this aim, many particular arrangements of metallic nanoparticles are both experimentally and theoretically analysed from the single, monodispersed nano-particle, to the bottom-up assembled surfaces, also on stretchable substrates. In a wider scenario, the combination of tunable media with plasmonic subunits is considered to enable active functionalities of resulting devices (Active Plasmonics). In the end, the special optical features of plasmonic nano-shells are investigated. The interaction between gain media (e. g. fluorescent organic dyes) and all of these nanoresonating structures is investigated by means of Time Correlated Single Photon Counting experiments.

People Involved

Giuseppe

Strangi

CNR Senior Research

Group Coordinator 

Michele

Giocondo

CNR Researcher

Alfredo

Pane

CNR Technician

Antonio

De Luca

Associate Professor

Roberto

Caputo

Associate Researcher

Rakesh

Dhama

Associate PostDoc

Carlo Consolato

Versace

Associate Professor

Franco

Cofone

CNR Technician

Tiziana

Ritacco

Associate PhD Student

Facilities & Labs

Research Lines

Publications

  1. Marae-Djouda, R. Caputo, N. Mahi, G. Lévêque, A. Akjouj, P.-M. Adam and T. Maurer, “Angular Plasmon Response of Gold Nanoparticles Arrays: Approaching the Rayleigh Limit”, Nanophotonics. 6,1, 279–288 (2017)
  2. V. Sreekanth, Y. Alapan, M. ElKabbash, E. Ilker, M. Hinczewski, U. A. Gurkan, A. De Luca and G. Strangi, “Extreme sensitivity biosensing platform based on hyperbolic metamaterials” Nature Materials, 15, 621-627, (2016)
  3. Dhama, A. R. Rashed, V. Caligiuri, M. El. Kabbash, G. Strangi, and A. De Luca, “Broadband optical transparency in plasmonic nanocomposite polymer films via exciton-plasmon energy transfer,” Opt. Express 24, 14632-14641 (2016).
  4. Caligiuri, R. Dhama, K.V. Sreekanth, G. Strangi and A. De Luca: “Dielectric singularity in hyperbolic metamaterials: the inversion point of coexisting anisotropies”, Sci. Rep., 6, Article number: 20002 (2016).
  5. Caligiuri and A. De Luca, “Metal-Semiconductor-Oxide extreme Hyperbolic Metamaterials for selectable canalization wavelength” J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., 2016, 49.
  6. Maurer1, J. Marae-Djouda, U. Cataldi, A. Gontier, G. Montay, Y. Madi, B. Panicaud, D. Macias-Guzman, P.-M. Adam, G. Lévêque, T. Bürgi and R. Caputo, “The beginnings of plasmomechanics: towards plasmonic strain sensors”, Front. Mat. Sci. 9, 2, 170,(2015)
  7. Ivanov V.G., Todorov N.D., Petrov L.S, Ritacco T, Giocondo M and Vlakhov E.S., “Strong surface enhanced Raman scattering from gold nanoarrays obtained by direct laser writing”, October 2016 Phys: Conf. Ser. 764(1): 012023
  8. Ritacco T, Ricciardi L, La Deda M, and Giocondo M, “Controlling the optical creation of gold nanoparticles in a PVA matrix by direct laser writing”, 2016 Eur. Opt. Soc.-Rapid 11 16008

Projects

  1. PRIN 2012 – prot. 2012JHFYMC – “Gain-Plasmon Coupling in Metal-Dielectric Nanostructures: Loss Compensation towards Laser Action”
  2. ICT COST Action IC1208, “Integrating devices and materials: a challenge for new instrumentation in ICT”, (http://www.cost.eu/COST_Actions/ict/IC1208)

Latest News

  • Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Lecce, Italy, 2017 Wednesday July 19th 

    CNR NANOTEC @ Lecce, Aula Seminari – pal. G, Piano Terra

    Program – PDF

    Zeiss, as microscopy technology leader, provides the unique complete imaging solution ranging from light, confocal, electron, ion and Xray modalities with a complete and straightforward correlative workflow. An overview of different technologies will be presented with a special focus on X-Rray microscopy.

  • MCS 2017

    International Workshop on Micropropulsion and CubeSats

    Bari, Italy, 26 – 27 June 2017

    Program – MSC2017

    This narrow-field, invited-only meeting is the first attempt to bring together the Materials and Micropropulsion communities with a view to contribute to the development of the Global Materials and Micropropulsion Roadmap, and set such meetings to a regular basis.

  • Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Cetraro (CS), 3 -5 maggio 2017

    Il programma completo dell’evento – download

    La tre giorni dedicata ai risultati di ricerca conseguiti e alle strategie scientifiche da intraprendere nel prossimo futuro.

Photonics & Optoelectronics

The investigation of frontier physics mainly related to the interactions and coupling of light with matter both from a macroscopic point of view as well as at the single particle level. Collective coherent phenomena of condensates of Bose Einstein are studied in semiconductor materials exploiting quasiparticles generated by the strong coupling between light and excited states of matter to unravel a rich phenomenology of quantum fluids under superfluid or supersonic regimes, exploring the dynamics of vortex states, optically driven non-equilibrium condensates and the expanding or trapping of quantum gases. Other fields of interest are correlation of quantum states, and highly confined plasmon-polariton fields. Inorganic semiconductors and organic materials are investigated from a fundamental point of view as well as for new applicative concepts, like all-optical transistors, switches and logical gates.

Metamaterials

Metamaterials (MMs) constitute the frontier in material science technology. Unlike classic natural materials, MMs optical properties can be easily tailored as desired by…

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Plasmonics

Plasmons are electromagnetic modes associated with the coherent excitation by photons of the free electrons at the interface between a metal and a dielectric material…

Optofluidics

Complex light beams realized by phase modulation techniques represent a versatile tool in several fields of optics as the material structuring at small scales and the optical…

Latest News

  • Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Lecce, Italy, 2017 Wednesday July 19th 

    CNR NANOTEC @ Lecce, Aula Seminari – pal. G, Piano Terra

    Program – PDF

    Zeiss, as microscopy technology leader, provides the unique complete imaging solution ranging from light, confocal, electron, ion and Xray modalities with a complete and straightforward correlative workflow. An overview of different technologies will be presented with a special focus on X-Rray microscopy.

  • MCS 2017

    International Workshop on Micropropulsion and CubeSats

    Bari, Italy, 26 – 27 June 2017

    Program – MSC2017

    This narrow-field, invited-only meeting is the first attempt to bring together the Materials and Micropropulsion communities with a view to contribute to the development of the Global Materials and Micropropulsion Roadmap, and set such meetings to a regular basis.

  • Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Cetraro (CS), 3 -5 maggio 2017

    Il programma completo dell’evento – download

    La tre giorni dedicata ai risultati di ricerca conseguiti e alle strategie scientifiche da intraprendere nel prossimo futuro.

Biosensors & Bioelectronics

At NANOTEC Institute, several research activities are in progress concerning the optimization of a wide range of biosensors able to respond, alone or integrated in multifunctional sensing platform, to specific needs of several biological applications. On one side, we employ different biorecognition elements (antibodies, aptamers or molecular imprinted polymers) to achieve specificity. On the other, we exploit various transduction methods ranging from optical to electrical and mechanical ones in order to miniaturize the assay, reduce the cost and/or increase the sensitivity. Moreover, our studies investigate also the use of biomaterials for electronics applications. More in detail:

A panel which summarizes the different transduction strategies applied to biorecognition at NANOTEC

Biorecognition elements for sensor specificity

Many biological events are closely associated with the specific binding between biomolecules that complement each other in shape, size, charge and chemical functionality, and self-organize with nanoscale dimension at an interface (i.e., lipid assemblies, proteins, viruses). To attain high specificity and efficiency, biosensors exploit molecular recognition such as DNA base pairing or antigen-antibody reactions but we also employ aptamers and molecular imprinted polymers as emerging molecular probes. However, achieving rapid and efficient specific molecular interaction often depends on immobilization of receptors to solid surfaces with appropriate surface density, preserving the functional conformation and optimizing the presentation of the binding fragments towards the target analyte. Moreover, the ability to bind/release a molecule of interest in response to an external stimulus (i.e., temperature, pH, irradiation), has a practical impact in the field of bioseparations (purification of proteins, enzymes, pharmaceuticals) and drug delivery. In this respect, in situ analytic techniques able to determine the absolute orientation and conformation of bio- and biomimetic molecules at the interfaces are of paramount relevance. Furthermore, dynamically probing the active sites during the binding/releasing event would provide a molecular-level understanding of the receptor-analyte interaction, and eventually shed light on how the performance of biological processes in living organisms depends on the biomolecular interfacial architectures. Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) allows achieving the conformational structure and orientation distribution of biomimetic and bio- molecules at interfaces, in the working environment for chemical and biochemical sensing. As a second-order nonlinear optical processes, SFG-VS has been proven to be a versatile tool for non-invasive probing of any interface accessible by light, with intrinsic surface specificity, chemical selectivity and sub-monolayer sensitivity. Being electric-dipole forbidden in centrosymmetric bulk media but allowed at interfaces where inversion symmetry is naturally broken, SFG is highly interface-specific. SFG is a process in which two input laser beams at VIS and IR frequencies interact in a medium and generate an output beam at frequency ω_SFG=ω_VIS+ω_IR. When ω_VIS (ω_IR) and/or ω_SFG are tuned over resonances, SFG is resonantly enhanced thus yielding surface spectroscopic information. For molecular systems, vibrational spectroscopy is often more selective, since it permits identification of molecular species and provides information about their functional groups. Therefore SFG-VS, where the input beam ω_IR is scanned over vibrational resonances, has been largely exploited as surface-specific analytical probe for molecules at interfaces. SFG-VS is sensitive to the average polar orientation of each moiety and therefore to the overall molecular conformation. As a coherent process, the output beam is highly directional, allowing for in situ non-invasive remote sensing of the interface.

(Left) SFG-VS experiments are carried out at the solid-gas and liquid-gas interfaces, where surface-bound receptors are exposed to different analytes. (Right) Resonant enhancement and polarization dependence allow to deduce quantitatively conformational information on the receptors and assess the orientation of the analytes upon complexation.

Optical read-out: Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) and plasmonics

Optical sensor technology offers significant opportunities in the field of medical research and clinical diagnostics, spanning from colorimetric and fluorescent assays to more advanced approaches particularly suitable for the detection of a few molecules in highly-diluted solutions. At CNR-NANOTEC, several methods are under investigation. For example, a colorimetric “point-of-care” device was optimized exploiting electrochromism for the detection of ions in biological fluids. For few molecules detection, we are then working on label-free plasmonic biosensors based on metallic nanostructures and metamaterials. To detect lower molecular weight (<500 Da) biomolecules in highly-diluted solutions, we are investigating a hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM)-based plasmonic biosensor platform, which can support highly confined bulk plasmon guided modes in a wide wavelength range, from visible to near infrared. Hyperbolic metamaterials are perhaps the most unusual electromagnetic metamaterials, featuring hyperbolic (or indefinite) dispersion because one of their principal components has the opposite sign to the other two. Our HMM sensor device shows many highly sensitive resonant modes with a maximum sensitivity of 30,000 nm/RIU and a maximum figure of merit of 590 at near IR wavelength. In collaboration with CNR-IMM, we have also recently optimized colloidal nano-lithography as a cheap approach to fabricate planar distributions of plasmonic nanostructures with tailored optical functionalities.

Mechanical read-out: QCM and SAW

Another trasduction mechanism under investigation at CNR-NANOTEC is based on a mechanical approach. If opportunely functionalized, a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) interacts with analytes in solution to estimate the concentration or can be used for cell studies. In our labs, we have employed QCM to study peptide-antibody interactions to allow detection of new biomarkers for early diagnosis of aggressive forms of cancer. Another application was in the field of ophthalmology to search for innovative coatings to improve contact lens performances and produce biofouling surfaces. Recently QCM was used to investigate cancer cell-drug interactions and to probe aptamer-toxin interactions in the perspective of developing biosensors for monitoring food quality. To further improve the sensitivity in mass detection, we are also working on Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology and we recently optimized both delay lines and resonators.

Electrical read-out: E.I.S. and MR biosensors

Tailoring low cost, portable, easy handled devices for simple and rapid assays is a major goal for current technology research. In this respect, an electrical read-out can provide advantages. In our labs, we optimized electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) based biosensors consisting of couples of interdigitated electrodes made of gold on a glass substrate integrated with a microfluidic module for the automatic handle and delivery of solutions and samples to the sensing areas of the device. This EIS platform has been used in Lecce for diagnostics, food control, environmental monitoring and cell studies.

Recently, in Bari, a label-free impedance device was also optimized for virus early detection in apparently asimptomatic plants at attomolar concentration in collaboration with the CNR IPSP – Istituto per la Protezione Sostenibile delle Piante, UoS Bari. Specifically, Tomato the mosaic virus (ToMV) and the Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TyMV) were analyzed and the different virus charges have been found to regulate the impedance response and the electrochemical interaction with a textured surface, enabling selectiveness and quantification.

In this frame, properly functionalized nanostructures can act as high sensitive recognition element due to the high surface to volume ratio. As a different strategy, in our labs, in collaboration with Technion Institute in Haifa (Israel), functionalized silicon nanowires arrays (SiNWs) were embedded on interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) for TFT devices responding to low Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) concentration produced by human breath when affected by gastric cancer for a novel non invasive cancer diagnostic technique.

At NANOTEC we are also investigating magnetoresistance sensors as transducers since they promise excellent sensitivity in the detection of biomolecules labeled by magnetic particles. A new H2020 project will exploit this technology for achieving early detection of neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer and Parkinson).

(top) T.E.M. images of Tomato Mosaic and Turnip Yellow Mosaic virsuses (center) Schetch of the Droplet-on-high hydropobic support device structure for label free recognition and quantification of viruses via E.I.S. measurements. (bottom). Recent experimental results evidencing the feasibility of virus recognition and quantification (right)

Plasma processing of materials for sensing 

Plasma processing can be used to modify the surface properties of materials for sensing. Plasma assisted functionalization of surfaces can be performed in order to introduce nitrogen and oxygen containing groups other than micro-nanopatterned surfaces and promote further immobilization or analysis of molecules

Bioelectronics

In bio-molecules, like amino-acid derivatives, proteins etc.. the water bounding is of fundamental importance. This feature is generally encountered in living cells, where water binds to the structure and fluctuates from an ordered to a disordered structure. In this respect melanin and melanin-like materials have displayed a peculiar hydration dependent modification of their properties and specifically of the electrical one, leading to consider melanin as an electret able to store water derived charges.

Even if such behavior was a well known feature disclosed in the past, only recently our group was able to demonstrate that it is possible not only to relate the amount of the stored charge to the magnitude of an applied signal (e.g. a continuous voltage) but also that the transmitted information is not erasable and can be stored for a long time. Moreover, depending from the hydration state, the origin of the storage is switching from an electron/hole charge trapping to a polarization effect, the latter regulated by the residual water ions. A recently afforded fundamental issue concerns the kind of physicochemical interactions between water molecules and eumelanin in determining the functionalities, which possibly can hinder the development of rational strategies to fine tune the ionic-electronic conduction mechanisms, a primary goal in the design of bio-electronic devices useful for memory recovering or powering.

As valid alternative to melanins-based biological system, Polydopamine (pDA) constitutes an attractive platform due to the easy deposition by dip-coating, the eumelanin-like properties and the possibility to tune its properties by binding to proper functionalities. As an example, our group thanks to the collaboration with the Prof. M. d’Ischia’s group (Chemistry Dpt at the University of Naples) was able to demonstrate the feasibility of chemical doping and tuning of the electrical transport when pDA is co-polymerized with electron-donating systems. Inspired by the powerful photosensitizing properties of the red hair pigments pheomelanins, a photoresponsive cysteine-containing polydopamine obtained via oxidative copolymerization of dopamine (DA) and 5-S-cysteinyldopamine (CDA) in variable ratios was produced and tested. In particular, the obtained copolymer replicates in a certain extent, the structure of neuromelanin. The use of the p(DA/CDA) copolymer constituted in this case a first example of technological exploitation of photoactive, red hair-inspired biomaterials as soft enhancement layer for a bio-friendly bio- device with a chemically tunable response to visible light. Interestingly, respect to pDA, the p(DA/CDA) copolymers displayed an interesting properties binding water in a fashion similar to those of biological materials and a marked photoimpedance response to light stimuli.

Recent findings on the tunablity of the electrical/optical properties of polydopamine including the doping modification (top) and enhancement of the optical response when passing from the black (eumelanin) to the reddish (pheomelanin) one after the addition of CDA

Facilities & Labs

Characterization Lab @ Lecce
Bio Lab @ Lecce
NanoFab Lab @ Lecce
Micro/nano fabrication @ Rende
Optoelectronic Characterization Labs@ URT Bari
Bio Lab @ URT Bari
Plasma Technologies Lab @ URT Bari
Chemical-Structural Characterization Lab @ URT Bari

People

Valentina_ArimaValentina

Arima

CNR Researcher

Monica_BiancoMonica

Bianco

CNR PostDoc

Elisabetta

Primiceri

CNR PostDoc

Laura_BlasiLaura

Blasi

CNR Researcher

Alessandra_ZizzariAlessandra

Zizzari

Associate PhD Student

Pietro-FaviaPietro

Favia

Associate Professor

Eloisa_SardellaEloisa

Sardella

CNR Researcher

Marianna_AmbricoMarianna

Ambrico

CNR Researcher

PaoloFrancesco_AmbricoPaolo Francesco

Ambrico

CNR Researcher

Pasquale_PagliusiPasquale

Pagliusi

Associate Professor

Giuseppe-StrangiGiuseppe

Strangi

CNR Researcher

Giuseppe_MaruccioGiuseppe

Maruccio

Associate Professor

AnnaGrazia_MonteduroAnna Grazia

Monteduro

Associate PostDoc

Serena_ChiriacòMaria Serena

Chiriacò

CNR PostDoc

Gabriella_CipparroneGabriella

Cipparrone

Associate Professor

scolesGiacinto

Scoles

Emeritus Professor

Publications

  1. M. Bianco, A. Sonato, A. De Girolamo, M. Pascale, F. Romanato, R. Rinaldi, V. Arima An aptamer-based SPR-polarization platform for high sensitive OTA detection Sensors & Actuators: B. Chemical 314-320 (2017) ISSN: 0925-4005; doi: 10.1016/j.snb.2016.10.056
  2. A. Aprile, F. Ciuchi, R. Pinalli, E. Dalcanale, P. Pagliusi, Probing Molecular Recognition at the Solid-Gas Interface by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy, Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 7, 3022-3026, (2016) ISSN 1948-7185; doi: 10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b01300
  3. A. Aprile, P. Pagliusi, F. Ciuchi, R. Pinalli, E. Dalcanale, Probing cavitand-organosilane hybrid bilayers via sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy, Langmuir 30, 12843 (2014) ISSN: 0743-7463; doi: 10.1021/la503150z.
  4. S. R. Cicco, M.Ambrico, P.F.Ambrico, M.Mastropasqua Talamo, A.Cardone,T.Ligonzo, R. DiMundo, C. Giannini, T. Sibillano, G.M. Farinola, P.Manini,A.Napolitano, V. Criscuolo, M. D’Ischia A water-soluble eumelanin polymer with typical polyelectrolyte behaviour by triethyleneglycol N-functionalization, Journal of Material Chemistry, C 3, 2810-2816 (2015) ISSN: 2050-7526; doi: 10.1039/c4tc01997k
  5. M. Ambrico, P.F. Ambrico, A. Cardone, S.R. Cicco, F. Palumbo, T. Ligonzo, R. di Mundo, V. Petta, V. Augelli, P. Favia and G. M. Farinola Melanin-like polymer layered on a nanotextured silicon surface for a hybrid biomimetic interface, Journal of Material Chemistry C, 2,573, (2014) ISSN 2050-7534; doi: 10.1039/c3tc31327a
  6. M. Ambrico, N.F. Della Vecchia, P.F. Ambrico, A. Cardone, S.R.Cicco, T. Ligonzo, R.Avolio and A. Napolitano, A Photoresponsive Red-Hair-Inspired Polydopamine Based Copolymer for Hybrid Photocapacitive Sensors, Advanced Functional Materials, 24,7161-7172, (2014), ISSN: 1616-3028; doi: 10.1002/adfm.201401377
  7. N. F. Della Vecchia, R. Marega, M. Ambrico, M. Iacomino, R. Micillo, A. Napolitano, D. Bonifazi  and M. d’Ischia Tailoring melanins for bioelectronics: polycysteinyldopamine as an ion conducting redox-responsive polydopamine variant for pro-oxidant thin films, Journal of Material Chemistry C, 3,6525-6531,(2015) ISSN 2050-7534; doi: 10.1039/c5tc00672d
  8. M. Ambrico (Lead Guest Editor) Special issue: Melanin, a long lasting history bridging natural pigments and organic bioelectronics, Polymer International, 65,11 (2016) ISSN: 1097-0126; doi: 10.1002/pi.5239
  9. G. Da Ponte, E. Sardella, F. Fanelli, S. Paulussen, P. Favia. Atmospheric pressure plasma deposition of poly lactic acid-like coatings with embedded elastin. Plasma Processes and Polymers 11-4, 342-352 (2014) ISSN: 1612-8850; doi: 10.1002/ppap.201300130
  10. M. Bianco, V. Guarino, G. Maruccio, G. Galli, E. Martinelli, G. Montani, R. Rinaldi and V. Arima Non-Biofouling Fluorinated Block Copolymer Coatings for Contact Lenses Sci. Adv. Mater. 7, 1387-1394 (2015). ISSN: 1947-2935; doi: 10.1166/sam.2015.2056
  11. Z. Ameer, E. Primiceri, F. De Feo, M. S. Chiriacò, A. G. Monteduro, G. Maruccio and R. Rinaldi, DNA sensors with impedimetric and magnetoresistive transduction – A comparison study, Proceedings of 2014 11th International Bhurban Conference on Applied Sciences and Technology, IBCAST 2014 65-68 (2014). ISSN: 2151-1403; doi: 10.1109/IBCAST.2014.6778122
  12. S. Chiriacò, F. de Feo, E. Primiceri, A. G. Monteduro, G. E. de Benedetto, A. Pennetta, R. Rinaldi and G. Maruccio, Portable gliadin-immunochip for contamination control on the food production chain Talanta 142, 57-63 (2015) ISSN: 00399140; doi: 10.1016/j.talanta.2015.04.040
  13. A. Colombelli, M. G. Manera, R. Rella, S. Rizzato, E. Primiceri, A. G. Monteduro and G. Maruccio, Colloidal lithography fabrication of tunable plasmonic nanostructures, IET Conference Publications 2015, Vol. 2015. doi: 10.1049/cp.2015.0148
  14. S. Chiriacò, E. Primiceri, F. De Feo, A. Montanaro, A. G. Monteduro, A. Tinelli, M. Megha, D. Carati and G. Maruccio, Simultaneous detection of multiple lower genital tract pathogens by an impedimetric immunochip, Biosensors and Bioelectronics 79, 9-14 (2016) ISSN: 0956-566; doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2015.11.100
  15. V. De Matteis, A. Cannavale, L. Blasi, A. Quarta, G. Gigli Chromogenic device for cystic fibrosis precocious diagnosis: A “point of care” tool for sweat test Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical 225, 474–480 (2016) ISSN: 09254005; doi: 10.1016/j.snb.2015.11.080
  16. G. Palazzo , D. De Tullio, M. Magliulo , A. Mallardi , F. Intranuovo , M.Y.Mulla , P.Favia, I.V.-Lundin , L. Torsi, Detection Beyond Debye’s Length with an Electrolyte-Gated Organic Field-Effect Transistor, Adv. Mater. 27, 911–916 (2015) ISSN: 0935-9648; doi: 10.1002/adma.201403541
  17. V. Sreekanth, Y. Alapan, M. ElKabbash, U. A. Gurkan, E. Ilker, M. Hinczevski, A. De Luca and G. Strangi, Extreme sensitivity biosensing platform based on hyperbolic metamaterials Nature Materials 15 (6), 621 (2016) ISSN: 1476-1122, DOI: 10.1038/NMAT4609
  18. V. Caligiuri, R. Dhama, K. Valiyaveedu Sreekanth, G. Strangi and A. De Luca Dielectric singularity in HMM: the inversion point of coexisting anisotropies, Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group) 6, 20002 (2016) ISSN: 2045-2322; doi: 10.1038/srep20002
  19. V. Sreekanth, K. Hari Krishna, A. De Luca and Giuseppe Strangi Large spontaneous emission rate enhancement in grating coupled hyperbolic metamaterials Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group) 4, 6340 (2014) ISSN: 2045-2322; doi: 10.1038/srep06340

Other selected publications:

  1. H. Haick, M.Ambrico, T.Ligonzo and D. Cahen, Controlling Semiconductor/Metal Junction Barriers by Incomplete, Nonideal Molecular Monolayers Journal of the American Chemical Society 128, 6854-6869 (2006) ISSN: 0002-7863; doi: 10.1021/ja058224a
  2. M. Ambrico, P.F.Ambrico, A.Cardone, T.Ligonzo, S.R.Cicco, R.Di Mundo, V. Augelli, G.M. Farinola, Melanin Layer on Silicon: an Attractive Structure for a Possible Exploitation in Bio-Polymer Based Metal-Insulator-Silicon Devices, Advanced Materials, 23,3332-3336,(2011) ISSN: 0935-9648; doi: 10.1002/adma.201101358
  3. M. Ambrico, A.Cardone, P.F,Ambrico, T.Ligonzo, V.Augelli, S.R.Cicco, G.M. Farinola, M.Filannino, G. Perna and V.Capozzi. Hysteresis-type current–voltage characteristics in Au/eumelanin/ITO/glass structure: Towards melanin based memory devices, Organic Electronics 11,1809-1814, 2010 ISSN: 1566-1199; doi: 10.1016/j.orgel.2010.08.001
  4. M. Tulliani, A. Cavalieri, S. Musso, E. Sardellad, F. Geobaldo; Room temperature ammonia sensors based on zinc oxide and functionalizedgraphite and multi-walled carbon nanotubes; Sensors and Actuators B 152 (2011) 144–154 ISSN: 0925-4005; doi: 10.1016/j.snb.2010.11.057
  5. V. Sreekanth, Antonio De Luca & Giuseppe Strangi   Experimental demonstration of surface and bulk plasmon  polaritons  in  hypergratings Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group) 3, 03291 (2013) ISSN: 2045-2322; doi: 10.1038/srep03291
  6. M. Bianco, A. Aloisi, V. Arima, M. Capello, S. Ferri-Borgogno, F. Novelli, S. Leporatti and R. Rinaldi Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) as tool to exploit antigen-antibody interactions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma detection Biosensors and Bioelectronics 42, 646–652 (2013) ISSN: 0956-5663; doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2012.10.012
  7. E. Primiceri, M. S. Chiriacò, E. D’Amone, E. Urso, R. E. Ionescu, A. Rizzello, M. Maffia, R. Cingolani, R. Rinaldi and G. Maruccio, Real-time monitoring of copper ions-induced cytotoxicity by EIS cell chips, Biosens. Bioelectron. 25, 2711-2716 (2010) ISSN: 09565663; doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2010.04.032
  8. M. S. Chiriacò, E. Primiceri, E. D’Amone, R. E. Ionescu, R. Rinaldi and G. Maruccio, EIS microfluidic chips for flow immunoassay and ultrasensitive cholera toxin detection, Lab on a Chip 11, 658-663 (2011). ISSN: 1473-0197; doi: 10.1039/c0lc00409j
  9. E. Primiceri, M. S. Chiriacò, F. Dioguardi, A. G. Monteduro, E. D’Amone, R. Rinaldi, G. Giannelli and G. Maruccio, Automatic transwell assay by an EIS cell chip to monitor cell migration, Lab on a Chip 11, 4081-4086 (2011). ISSN: 1473-0197; doi: 10.1039/c1lc20540d
  10. M. S. Chiriacò, E. Primiceri, A. Montanaro, F. de Feo, L. Leone, R. Rinaldi and G. Maruccio, On-chip screening for prostate cancer: an EIS microfluidic platform for contemporary detection of free and total PSA, Analyst 138, 5404-5410 (2013). ISSN: 0003-2654; doi: 10.1039/c3an00911d

Patent

  1. V. Sreekanth, Y. Alapan, M. ElKabbash, U. A. Gurkan, E. Ilker, M. Hinczevski, A. De Luca and G. Strangi, “Extreme sensitivity biosensing platform based on hyperbolic metamaterials” Invention Disclosure and  Patent Pending (USA)

Project

  1. Safemeat: Innovazioni di processo e di prodotto per incrementare i profili di sicurezza e per diversificare la gamma di prodotti (freschi e stagionati) a base di carne suina – MIUR-PON project (2012-2014)
  2. MADIA: Magnetic Diagnostic Assay for neurodegenerative diseases – H2020, ICT-03-2016 “SSI – Smart System Integration” (2017-2020)
  3. Nano-Biotecnologie per Diagnostica e sviluppo di Terapie innovative –  Regional project APQ Ricerca Scientifica—Reti di Laboratori Pubblici di Ricerca” – (2010-2012).

Latest News

Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

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Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

Lecce, Italy, 2017 Wednesday July 19th 

CNR NANOTEC @ Lecce, Aula Seminari – pal. G, Piano Terra

Program - PDF

Zeiss, as microscopy technology leader, provides the unique complete imaging solution ranging from light, confocal, electron, ion and Xray modalities with a complete and straightforward correlative workflow. An overview of different technologies will be presented with a special focus on X-Rray microscopy.

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MCS 2017

International Workshop on Micropropulsion and CubeSats

Bari, Italy, 26 - 27 June 2017

Program - MSC2017

This narrow-field, invited-only meeting is the first attempt to bring together the Materials and Micropropulsion communities with a view to contribute to the development of the Global Materials and Micropropulsion Roadmap, and set such meetings to a regular basis.

Workshop annuale d'Istituto - II ed.

Workshop annuale d'Istituto - II ed.

Cetraro (CS), 3 -5 maggio 2017

Il programma completo dell'evento - download

La tre giorni dedicata ai risultati di ricerca conseguiti e alle strategie scientifiche da intraprendere nel prossimo futuro.

Nano-Biotechnology

Nano-biotechnology aims at the development of nanotechnology-based tools for biomedical applications. The bottom-up and top-down approaches, typical of nanotechnology, applied to biology and biochemistry lead to the development of nanostructured materials and devices to improve several fields of current biomedical research like Biomolecular Delivery, advanced and high resolution Imaging and Regenerative Medicine. Nanotechnology investigation tools of materials and surfaces applied to biology increase the basic knowledge ofself-assembly of biomolecules (as described in Biointerfaces) and of cellular mechanisms (Cell Biology). In the view of providing “point-of-care” diagnostic toolsand state-of-the–art approaches towards personalized medicine,microscale devicesare developedas described in the sections Lab on Chip and Biosensors & Bioelectronics. Nano-biotechnological applications are supported by the Modeling, Theory and Computation reported in the section Computational Biology.

Biointerfaces

Surfaces covered and functionalized with biomolecules play a key role in nano-biotechnology. At NANOTEC we study the biomolecules at interfaces with…

immagine LOC

Lab on chip (LOC)

Surfaces covered and functionalized with biomolecules play a key role in nano-biotechnology. At NANOTEC we study the biomolecules at interfaces with…

immagine_biosensingbioelectronics-copy

Biosensors & Bioelectronics

At NANOTEC Institute, several research activities are in progress concerning the optimization of a wide range of biosensors able to respond, alone or integrated…

Latest News

  • Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Lecce, Italy, 2017 Wednesday July 19th 

    CNR NANOTEC @ Lecce, Aula Seminari – pal. G, Piano Terra

    Program – PDF

    Zeiss, as microscopy technology leader, provides the unique complete imaging solution ranging from light, confocal, electron, ion and Xray modalities with a complete and straightforward correlative workflow. An overview of different technologies will be presented with a special focus on X-Rray microscopy.

  • MCS 2017

    International Workshop on Micropropulsion and CubeSats

    Bari, Italy, 26 – 27 June 2017

    Program – MSC2017

    This narrow-field, invited-only meeting is the first attempt to bring together the Materials and Micropropulsion communities with a view to contribute to the development of the Global Materials and Micropropulsion Roadmap, and set such meetings to a regular basis.

  • Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Cetraro (CS), 3 -5 maggio 2017

    Il programma completo dell’evento – download

    La tre giorni dedicata ai risultati di ricerca conseguiti e alle strategie scientifiche da intraprendere nel prossimo futuro.

Advanced Devices

Starting from the different class of advanced materials studied and developed in NANOTEC, the Advanced Devices area focus on the integration of these materials into functional and multifunctional structures and devices with enhanced or new properties.   Large efforts are devoted to research and technology development at the nanoscale by using both, the bottom-up and top-down approaches, to allow (nano) structures, microarrays and components to be designed and fabricated for the realization of discrete electronic/photonic components of direct industrial and societal interest and for a wide range of applications. Devices such next generation of energy-saving light sources, low power and high speed electronics device, new generation of photovoltaic devices, spintronic devices based on single magnetic molecules/nanoparticles and on charge/spin transport, advanced sensors, catalytic devices are explored with a multidisciplinary approach and developed up to prototype level.

Photovoltaics

The recruitment of energy sources is becoming a worldwide strategic problem, because of the rapid depletion of fossil fuels from one hand, and the need of eco-compatible solutions to face the global warming…

Latest News

  • Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Lecce, Italy, 2017 Wednesday July 19th 

    CNR NANOTEC @ Lecce, Aula Seminari – pal. G, Piano Terra

    Program – PDF

    Zeiss, as microscopy technology leader, provides the unique complete imaging solution ranging from light, confocal, electron, ion and Xray modalities with a complete and straightforward correlative workflow. An overview of different technologies will be presented with a special focus on X-Rray microscopy.

  • MCS 2017

    International Workshop on Micropropulsion and CubeSats

    Bari, Italy, 26 – 27 June 2017

    Program – MSC2017

    This narrow-field, invited-only meeting is the first attempt to bring together the Materials and Micropropulsion communities with a view to contribute to the development of the Global Materials and Micropropulsion Roadmap, and set such meetings to a regular basis.

  • Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Cetraro (CS), 3 -5 maggio 2017

    Il programma completo dell’evento – download

    La tre giorni dedicata ai risultati di ricerca conseguiti e alle strategie scientifiche da intraprendere nel prossimo futuro.

Materials

NANOTEC is engaged in various aspects of materials research for advanced applications. Research activities are focused on growth and synthesis with various physical and chemical methodologies (CVD, MOCVD, MBE, PVD, PECVD, self-assembling, sol-gel, etc); based on fundamental research, we elucidate principles underpinning processing-structure-property relationships in functional materials and nanomaterials both inorganic and organic, and their hybrids and nanocomposites, with interesting electronic, magnetic, optical, mechanical or catalytic properties; we exploit those relationships to introduce new functionalities in materials science and build a basis for “predicting” new materials based on the established principles. Topics covered include III-V semiconductors, Si-based alloys, organic semiconductors, dielectrics, piezoelectrics, ferroelectrics, nanomaterials, graphene, 2D-materials, nanocomposites, colloidal nanocrystals, non-crystalline solids, self-assembled monolayers and functional surfaces. Through these efforts, NANOTEC aims to create advanced materials that contribute to society functional innovations.

nanostructures-self-assemblingr

Nanostructures & Self-Assembling

Nanomaterials are coming into use in healthcare, electronics, cosmetics, catalysis and other areas, because they bring novel mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical, electrochemical,…

Complex and anisotropic fluidsR360

Complex and anisotropic fluids

Liquid crystals are versatile materials, with outstanding anisotropic properties which can be a model for turbulence, a guide for the self assembling of nanoparticles or quantum dots…

Latest News

  • Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Lecce, Italy, 2017 Wednesday July 19th 

    CNR NANOTEC @ Lecce, Aula Seminari – pal. G, Piano Terra

    Program – PDF

    Zeiss, as microscopy technology leader, provides the unique complete imaging solution ranging from light, confocal, electron, ion and Xray modalities with a complete and straightforward correlative workflow. An overview of different technologies will be presented with a special focus on X-Rray microscopy.

  • MCS 2017

    International Workshop on Micropropulsion and CubeSats

    Bari, Italy, 26 – 27 June 2017

    Program – MSC2017

    This narrow-field, invited-only meeting is the first attempt to bring together the Materials and Micropropulsion communities with a view to contribute to the development of the Global Materials and Micropropulsion Roadmap, and set such meetings to a regular basis.

  • Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Cetraro (CS), 3 -5 maggio 2017

    Il programma completo dell’evento – download

    La tre giorni dedicata ai risultati di ricerca conseguiti e alle strategie scientifiche da intraprendere nel prossimo futuro.

Nanostructures & Self Assembling

Nanomaterials are coming into use in healthcare, electronics, cosmetics, catalysis and other areas, because they bring novel  mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical, electrochemical, catalytic properties differing markedly from that of the component materials.

Nanostructures are not simply another step in the miniaturization of materials. They often require very different production approaches. There are several processes to create nanomaterials, classified as ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’., which are explored at Nanotec.

Self-Assembled Monolayers (layers that are one atom or molecule deep) are also routinely made and used in chemistry. The formation and properties of these layers need to be understood from the atomic level upwards, even in quite complex layers (such as lubricants). Advances are being made in the control of the composition and smoothness of surfaces, and the growth of films.

Furthermore, engineered surfaces with tailored properties such as large surface area or specific reactivity are used routinely in a range of applications such as in fuel cells, sensing and catalysts. The large surface area provided by nanoparticles, together with their ability to self assemble on a support surface, could be of use in all of these applications. Main topics in the focus are:

  1. Metallic Plasmonic Nanosystems
  2. Molecular Architectures at Interfaces
  3. High Charge Mobility Columnar Mesophases
  4. Organic/inorganic Nanocomposites
  5. Nanotextured Materials

Metallic Plasmonic Nanosystems

Research topics:

  1. Design, growth and investigation of plasmonic nanostructures coupled to semiconductors, ceramics, glass and plastics by MBE, thermal evaporation and plasma sputtering
  2. Synthesis of plasmonic systems alternative to nobel metals
  3. Design and synthesis of novel multifunctional multi-metallic core-shell nanoparticles supported on various substrates combining plasmonic/catalytic (e.g. Ag/Pd) and plasmonic/magnetic (e.g Au/Co) functionalities
  4. Development of Biochemical sensing exploting SERS mechanism
  5. Design of Enhanced light-matter interaction coupling semiconductors
  6. Tailoring of surface energy of support at the interface nanoparticle/substrate to tune nanoparticle shape and plasmonic response
  7. Post growth processing by annealing and plasmas to tailor optical and plasmonic properties
  8. Development of system for liquid and phase-change plasmonics
  9. Exploitation of plasmonics in localized catalysis

 

Molecular Architectures at Interfaces

The interfaces between bulk media are often site of reactions and phenomena which are distinct from the bulk substances and frequently dominate the macroscopic properties of the entire system. Understanding how molecules adsorb and react with these surfaces has potential applications in industrial processes and everyday life. Catalyses, combustions, lubrication, adhesion, wetting, electrochemical reactions are only few examples of phenomena of industrial interest which are governed by interfacial properties. Polymer surfaces and interfaces play an increasingly important role in modern electronic and optoelectronic technologies (i.e. organic transistors, OLED), as well as in biomedical applications (i.e., biocompatibility). Surface-specific IR and visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful and versatile in situ surface probe which permits identification of surface molecular species and provides information about orientation of functional groups at the surface. SFG is non destructive, highly sensitive, and has good spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. Because the technique works in real time under water and protein solutions it is also very well suited for studying biomaterials and biointerfaces.

A) In SFG experiment, pulsed VIS and IR laser beams overlapping at an interface produce a nonlinear polarization density and hence a coherent output beam at the sum frequency . B) Resonant enhancement and beams polarization dependence of the active vibrational modes of molecules provide orientation of the moieties and the molecular architecture at interface
A) In SFG experiment, pulsed VIS and IR laser beams overlapping at an interface produce a nonlinear polarization density and hence a coherent output beam at the sum frequency . B) Resonant enhancement and beams polarization dependence of the active vibrational modes of molecules provide orientation of the moieties and the molecular architecture at interface

High Charge Mobility Columnar Mesophases

Molecularly organized supramolecular materials are promising candidates for applications in organic opto-electronics since the properties of functional materials can be enhanced when they have a well-organized internal structure. Within this frame, the ability of liquid crystals to self-organize in mesophases to obtain functional architectures is frequently exploited and, in particular, the properties of columar liquid crystals are exploited since they are able to stack spontaneously into columns to give one-dimensional structures of π-conjugated organic molecules. This organization reflects in a long-range π-orbital overlap that allows, after suitable charge injection, intracolumnar charge carrier mobilities with high values comparable to those of amorphous silicon. These properties make columnar liquid crystals very attractive materials for use as organic semiconductors.

Strategies

Study and characterization of novel columnar liquid crystal based on innovative molecular and supramolecular architectures ;

Studies of discotic mesophases whit ambipolar electrical conductivity;

Development of high mobility columnar mesophases with suitable mechanical and physical properties for application in devices (OFET, Photovoltaics etc.)

Organic/inorganic  nanocomposites

Organic-inorganic nanocomposites consisting of metal or metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in an organic matrix combine unique properties offered by both organic and inorganic components on a nanoscale level and are, therefore, attractive materials for a large number of applications in the field of catalysis (e.g., Pt, ZnO, TiO2), sensing, optical filters, antibacterial metal (Ag, Cu) delivery systems, plasmonic devices.

Strategies

  1. One-step simultaneous metal sputtering and plasma polymerization from a suitable monomer forming the embedding matrix. This approach, carried out in reactor as TRIMAG is particularly appealing since it is possible to independently change the precursor of the matrix (CFx, CHx, SiOx,…) and the metal target (Au, Pt, Ag, …) producing different nano-composite coatings with tunable metal content.
  2. Nanocomposite coatings containing Metal oxide nanoparticles can be prepared in low pressure reactors as TRIMAG (link a TRIMAG in URT Facilities) using the oxide target or the metal one, in a O2 containing plasma.
  3. Inorganic nanoparticles/polymer nanocomposite coatings are prepared by an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge fed with the aerosol of a dispersion containing preformed NPs and the  precursor of the organic matrix.

Nanotextured materials

Plasma nanotexturing is a quite fast method to address biomimetic properties to simple raw materials such as polymer or glass.  It can be driven via bottom up approach or a top down one: in the first case the adsorbed precursors can organize in a hierarchical way leading to  a micro/nanotextured coating, in the latter subtractive etching, assisted by the random arrival of inhibitors,  leads to the formation of pillars. After nanotexturing, the chemistry of the surface can be tuned by a suitable plasma deposited coatings, to become more hydrophobic or hydrophilic or functionalized. Nanotextured surfaces give access to unique properties such as water and oil repellency, antireflectivity (moth eye effect), superhydrophilicity and anti-fog.

Strategies

  1. Nanotexturing of surfaces can be obtained by plasma rough etching of polymers with O2 fed plasma or in the case of silicon based materials (Si, SiO2 but even silicone) with fluorine producing plasmas
  2. transfer of a pattern produced by exposing a micro-featured (i.e. TEM copper grid) or nano-featured mask (i.e. colloidal lithography)
  3. deposition of teflon-like coatings in soft plasma conditions (i.e. modulated/pulsed discharges)
  4. aerosol-assited cold plasma deposition of nanocomposite coatings consisting of inorganic nanoparticles embedded in an organic matrix and showing hierarchical multiscale surface texture.

Facilities & Labs

NanoChem @ URT Bari

LyCril @ Rende (CS)

P.LAS.M.I. Lab @ Bari

People

Maria_LosurdoMaria

Losurdo

Director of Research CNR

Giovanni_BrunoGiovanni

Bruno

Associate Director of Research CNR

mariamichelgiangregorio_researcherMaria Michela

Giangregorio

CNR Researcher

giuseppevalerioBianco_researcherGiuseppe Valerio

Bianco

CNR Researcher

Fiorenza_FanelliFiorenza

Fanelli

CNR Researcher

Francesco FracassiFrancesco

Fracassi

Associate Professor

Eloisa_SardellaEloisa

Sardella

CNR Researcher

Federica_ciuchiFederica

Chiuchi

CNR Researcher

Pasquale_PagliusiPasquale

Pagliusi

Associate Professor

termineRoberto

Termine

CNR Research

fabio_palumbor150Fabio

Palumbo

CNR Researcher

Pietro-FaviaPietro

Favia

Associate Professor

Antonella MilellaAntonella

Milella

Associate Professor

Attilio_GolemmeAttilio

Golemme

Associate Professor

Viso_UomoAlessandro

Servidio

Associate PHD Student

Publications

  1. A. Aprile, F. Ciuchi, R. Pinalli, E. Dalcanale, P. Pagliusi, Probing Molecular Recognition at the Solid-Gas Interface by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy, Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 7, 3022-3026, (2016) DOI10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b01300
  2. Feringan, P. Romero, J. L. Serrano, C. L. Folcia, J. Etxebarria, J. Ortega, R. Termine, A. Golemme, R Gimenez, T Sierra, “H-Bonded Donor-Acceptor Units Segregated in Coaxial Columnar Assemblies: Toward High Mobility Ambipolar Organic SemiconductorsJournal of the American Chemical Society, 138, 12511-8, (2016) DOI:10.1021/jacs.6b06792
  3. Gracia, B. Fering_n, J. L. Serrano, R. Termine, A. Golemme, A. Omenat, J. Barberà, “Functional Carbazole Liquid-Crystal Block Codendrimers with Optical and Electronic PropertiesChemistry – a European Journal, 21, 1359-1369, (2015) DOI:10.1002/chem.201404555
  4. M. W. Knight, T. Coenen, Y. Yang, B. J.M. Brenny, M. Losurdo, A. S. Brown, H. O. Everitt, A. Polman, “Gallium Plasmonics: Deep Subwavelength Spectroscopic Imaging of Single and Interacting Gallium Nanoparticles” ACS Nano 9, 2049–2060 (2015) Doi:1021/nn5072254

Other selected publications:

  1. M. Losurdo, C. Yi, A. Suvorova, S. Rubanov, T.-H. Kim, M M Giangregorio, W Jiao, I. Bergmair, G. Bruno, A. S Brown, Demonstrating the Capability of the High-Performance Plasmonic Gallium-Graphene Couple, ACS Nano 02/2014; 8(3). DOI:10.1021/nn500472r
  2. Y. Yang, N. Akozbek, T.-H Kim, J. Marcos Sanz, F. Moreno, M. Losurdo, A. S. Brown, H. O. Everitt, “Ultraviolet-visible plasmonic properties of gallium nanoparticles investigated by variable angle spectroscopic and Mueller matrix ellipsometry”, ACS Photonics, 1, 582 (2014) DOI: 10.1021/ph500042v
  3. M. M.Giangregorio, B. Dastmalchi, A. Suvorova, G.V. Bianco, K. Hingerll, G. Bruno, M. Losurdo,Effect of Interface Energy and Electron Transfer on Shape, Plasmon resonance and SERS activity of Supported Surfactant-free Gold NanoparticlesRSC Adv., 4, 29660-29667 (2014) DOI: 10.1039/c4ra03749a
  4. M.M. Giangregorio, G.V. Bianco, P. Capezzuto, G. Bruno and M. Losurdo, “Surface plasmon resonance combined with spectroscopic ellipsometry read-out for probing surface–biomolecule interaction” Thin Solid Films, 571, 478-483 (2014) DOI: 10.1016/j.tsf.2013.11.143
  5. F. Fanelli, F. Fracassi Aerosol-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma Deposition of Organic–Inorganic Nanocomposite Coatings, Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, 34,  473-487 (2014) DOI: 10.1007/s11090-013-9518-9
  6. F. Fanelli, A. M. Mastrangelo, F. Fracassi, Aerosol-Assisted Atmospheric Cold Plasma Deposition and Characterization of Superhydrophobic Organic–Inorganic Nanocomposite Thin Films, Langmuir, 30, 857–865 (2014) doi: 10.1021/la404755n
  7. R. Di Mundo, R. d’Agostino, F. Palumbo, Long-Lasting Antifog Plasma Modification of Transparent Plastics, ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces,  6, 17059–17066, (2014) doi: 10.1021/am504668s
  8. 10.A. Aprile, P. Pagliusi, F. Ciuchi, R. Pinalli, E. Dalcanale, Probing cavitand-organosilane hybrid bilayers via sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy, Langmuir 30, 12843 (2014) DOI: 10.1021/la503150z
  9. J. M. Sanz, D. Ortiz, R. Alcaraz de la Osa, J. M. Saiz, F. González, A. S. Brown, M. Losurdo, H. O. Everitt, and F. Moreno, UV Plasmonic Behavior of Various Metal Nanoparticles in the Nearand Far-Field Regimes: Geometry and Substrate Effects” J. Phys. Chem. C 117, 19606−19615 (2013). DOI: 10.1021/jp405773p
  10. T.W.H. Oates, M. Losurdo, S. Noda, K. Hinrichs, “The effect of atmospheric tarnishing on the optical and structural properties of silver nanoparticles” J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 46, 145308 (6pp) (2013) DOI: 10.1088/0022-3727/46/14/145308
  11. G.V. Bianco, M. Losurdo, M.M. Giangregorio, P. Capezzuto, G. Bruno, “Direct Fabrication Route to Plastic-supported Gold Nanoparticles for flexible NIR-SERS” Plasmonics 8, 159-165 (2013) DOI: 10.1007/s11468-012-9458-x
  12. Di Mundo, R.,  Palumbo, F., Barucca, G., Sabato, G., D’Agostino, R., On the “growth” of nano-structures on c-Silicon via self-masked plasma etching processes, Plasma Processes and Polymers, 10, 843-849 (2013), doi: 10.1002/ppap.201300031
  13. Sardella, E.,  Liuzzi, F.,  Comparelli, R.,  Depalo, N.,  Striccoli, M.,  Agostiano, A.,  Favia, P.,  Curri, M.L. Functionalized luminescent nanocrystals on patterned surfaces obtained by radio frequency glow discharges,   Nanotechnology ,24, 12 (2013) DOI:10.1002/ppap.200900112
  14. Bucos, T. Sierra, A. Golemme, R. Termine, J. Barbera, R. Gimenez, J. Luis Serrano, P. Romero, M. Marcos, “Multifunctional Supramolecular Dendrimers with an s-Triazine Ring as the Central Core: Liquid Crystalline, Fluorescence and Photoconductive Properties” Chemistry – a European Journal, 20, 10027-10037 (2014).
  15. Benito-Hernandez, U.K. Pandey, E. Cavero, R. Termine, E. M. Garcia-Frutos, J. L. Serrano, A. Golemme, B. Gomez-Lor, “High Hole Mobility in Triindole-Based Columnar phases: Removing the Bottleneck of Homogeneous Macroscopic Orientation”Chemistry of Material, 25, 117-121 (2013).
  16. Pérez, J. L. Serrano, T. Sierra, A. Ballesteros, D. de Saá, R. Termine, U. Kumar Pandey, A. Golemne,A Linear Conjugated Core for Multifunctional Columnar Liquid CrystalsNew Journal of Chemistry, 36, 830-842 (2012).
  17. C.Y. Chen, Wei-Tao Liu, P. Pagliusi, Y.R. Shen Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy study of photo-irradiated polymer surfaces Macromolecules 42, 2122-2126 (2009)
  18. P. Pagliusi, F. Lagugné-Labarthet, D.K. Shenoy, E. Dalcanale, Y.R. Shen Sensing vase-to-kite switching of cavitands by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy, Journal of the American Chemical Society 128, 12610-12611 (2006)
  19. P. Pagliusi, C.Y. Chen, Y.R. Shen, Molecular orientation and alignment of rubbed poly(vinyl cinnamate) surfaces, Journal of Chemical Physics 125, 201104 (2006)

Patents

Projects

Latest News

  • Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Lecce, Italy, 2017 Wednesday July 19th 

    CNR NANOTEC @ Lecce, Aula Seminari – pal. G, Piano Terra

    Program – PDF

    Zeiss, as microscopy technology leader, provides the unique complete imaging solution ranging from light, confocal, electron, ion and Xray modalities with a complete and straightforward correlative workflow. An overview of different technologies will be presented with a special focus on X-Rray microscopy.

  • MCS 2017

    International Workshop on Micropropulsion and CubeSats

    Bari, Italy, 26 – 27 June 2017

    Program – MSC2017

    This narrow-field, invited-only meeting is the first attempt to bring together the Materials and Micropropulsion communities with a view to contribute to the development of the Global Materials and Micropropulsion Roadmap, and set such meetings to a regular basis.

  • Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Cetraro (CS), 3 -5 maggio 2017

    Il programma completo dell’evento – download

    La tre giorni dedicata ai risultati di ricerca conseguiti e alle strategie scientifiche da intraprendere nel prossimo futuro.

Complex and anisotropic fluids

Liquid crystals are versatile materials, with outstanding anisotropic properties which can be a model for turbulence, a guide for the self assembling of nanoparticles or quantum dots. The guided self assembling control can be applied to the development of miniaturized devices for the optics, photonics and microfluidics. Their birefringence and their optical properties allow the LC employment in technological applications such as displays, sensors, lasers, gratings.

A special class of liquid crystal are biocompatible and then can be used in biological sensing.

Nanoconfinement of  liquid crystals (LC) and anisotropic fluids dynamics

The structure and response of complex and anisotropic fluids such as LC can be very different in the bulk, where molecules interact with each other and with external fields (e.g. electromagnetic field), and at the interfaces where molecule-surface interactions may become dominant. For instance, a surface may enhance or inhibit the LC order (e.g., orientational order in nematic LC) or even induce a new type of order (e.g. positional smectic-like order) compared to the bulk. When a LC is confined to a length scale comparable with the coherence length of the order that is being induced or altered, the liquid may undergo a structural transition and show a different mechanical or electro-optical response.

The viscoelastic description of anisotropic fluids is conventionally done at fixed topologies. The research in nematic electrooptics has been strongly stimulated by the demonstration of fast coherent switching between two topologically distinct textures by means of the electrically controlled biaxial order reconstruction in nematics (BORN). Thermotropic nematics consist of rigid molecular core units, which  can build a nematic phase with uniaxial order, usually described by using the scalar order parameter S and the director n (average molecular orientation). Nevertheless, uniaxial nematics under strong external constraints can induce a local and/or transient biaxial order at nanometric scale and the (n,S) description is no longer adequate. This is the case of BORN, which requires a tensorial description of the nematic material. The BORN allows the dynamical reconstruction of the long axis of the nematic order tensor Q in a perpendicular direction with respect to a starting one. This means that a nematic texture can locally be reconstructed in a perpendicular direction without any rotation of n. This allows to connect nematic textures with different topologies.

Furthermore nematic and smectic LC confined between solid surfaces can be studied using the Surface Force Apparatus (SFA) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). By accurately measuring the surface forces generated by nanometer films with non homogeneous boundary conditions, we could reveal a structural transition towards a partial biaxial phase and measure the complex mechanical response of a smectic LC.

complex668x149
Complex600x395

Defect pattern self-assembly and guided nanoparticle (NP) assembly in thin liquid crystal films.

We propose a bottom-up approach to create patterns and templates by dispersing or conjugating functional NPs with an anisotropic LC materials that can self-assemble into ordered and aligned structures over multiple length scales. Periodic patterns of topological defects can be created in thin films of layered materials such as smectic LC and cholesteric LC. The interaction of NPs with the core of the defects determines both a regular spatial distribution and alignment of NPs.

The dispersion of gold NPs in a chiral nematic LC shows that Au NP’s presence, besides affecting LC order, influences its electric properties: ion conductivity results importantly reduced, and beyond a threshold value of the applied field electrophoresis phenomena are induced.

Furthermore quantum dots can be dispersed in the LC medium: they accumulate in the topological defects and their position can be tuned by laser light by means of the holographic control of the command surfaces or by electric field. This result can be applied to the development of miniaturized devices for the optics, photonics and microfluidics.

Self Assembled Structures

Technological applications of liquid crystals: displays, sensors, lasers, gratings

Nematic and cholesteric LC are very attractive materials for the development of optical and electro-optical devices. In particular, due to their helicoidal supramolecular structure, cholesteric LC may be considered as one-dimensional photonic structures. Cholesteric materials possess several unique properties: 100 % selective reflection of circularly polarized light and the ability to change their selective reflection wavelength changing external or internal factors (electric, and electromagnetic fields, temperature, local order). In the years, cholesteric liquid crystals have been used to develop different devices as luminescent displays, mirror-less lasers, paper-like mirrors and temperature sensors at the microscale.

Chromonic materials and their interaction with surfaces

Chromonics are a LC class of soft matter in which the aggregates are reversibly self-assembled by non-amphiphilic molecules. This term includes drugs, dyes and DNA nucleotides, such as guanosine derivatives, all biocompatible materials.

Their anisotropic optical properties can be used for enhancing optical images. In fact chromonics are not toxic to many microbial species and they do not alter the antibody-antigen binding, important conditions for using them in biological sensing. The interaction of chromonics with surfaces and the alignment that surfaces induce, is subject of the present task.

Complex and anisotropic fluids

Electroconvective turbulence

The dynamics of nematic LC subject to an external electric field can be described by nonlinear equations that recall the convective motion of fluids and plasmas. This results in a number of features which can be studied in the framework of turbulence, such as the generation of vortical motion. In particular, the presence of a multiplicative cascade of structures on smaller and smaller scales can be observed, and its dependence on the experimental parameters reveal a rich variety of phenomena, which are typical of complex flows.

The study of electroconvective turbulence is mostly based on the analysis of experimental observations produced in the Licryl laboratory under a broad range of experimental conditions. Subsequently, advanced data analysis techniques are applied, so that the similarities with the ordinary turbulence can be established, and the turbulence characteristics pointed out. The main results are the characterization of intermittency in nematic LC electroconvection and the study of the sweeping effect in nematic LC electroconvective turbulence: the analysis of the space-time autocorrelation function has allowed the evaluation of the effect of large-scale structure decorrelation on turbulence, also providing the first experimental evidence of such phenomenon.

electroconvectiveR400x398

Facilities & Labs

LyCril @Rende

People

Federica_ciuchiFederica

Ciuchi

CNR Researcher

Alfredo_MazzullaAlfredo

Mazzulla

CNR Researcher

michel giocondoMichele

Giocondo

CNR Researcher

Luca_Sorriso_valvoLuca

Sorriso-Valvo

CNR Researcher

Giuseppe-StrangiGiuseppe

Strangi

Associate Professor

Bruno_ZapponeBruno

Zappone

CNR Researcher

MariaPenelope_DeSantoMaria Pia

De Santo

Associate Researcher

Pasquale_PagliusiPasquale

Pagliusi

Associate Professor

Gabriella

Cipparrone

Associate Professor

Roberto_bartolinoRoberto

Bartolino

Associate Professor

Riccardo_BarbieriRiccardo

Barbieri

Associate Professor

versaceCarlo C.

Versace

Associate Professor

Publications

  1. Coursault, D.; Zappone, B.; Coati, A.; …. Lacaze, E. “Self-organized arrays of dislocations in thin smectic liquid crystal films” Soft Matter DOI: 10.1039/C5SM02241J (2016)
  2. Gryn I., Lacaze E., Carbone L., Giocondo M., Zappone B. Electric-Field-Controlled Alignment of Rod-Shaped Fluorescent Nanocrystals in Smectic Liquid Crystal Defect Arrays, Adv. Funct. Mat. in press DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201602729
  3. Kasyanyuk D., Pagliusi P., Mazzulla A., Reshetnyak V., Reznikov Y., Provenzano C., Giocondo M., Vasnetsov M., Yaroshchuk O., Cipparrone G. Light manipulation of nanoparticles in arrays of topological defects, Scientific Reports 6, 20742 (2016) DOI: 10.1038/srep20742
  4. Provenzano C., Mazzulla A., Chiaravalloti F., Audia B., Cipparrone G. Topological defects and electro-convective flows in anisotropic fluids: A microfluidic platform for nano-objects tunable structuring. Appl. Phys. Lett. Vol. 109, 7, Article number 071901 (2016) DOI: 10.1063/1.4960635
  5. D. Coursault, J.-F. Blach, J. Grand, A. Coati, A. Vlad, B. Zappone, D. Babonneau, E. Lacaze et al. “Tailoring Anisotropic Interactions between Soft Nanospheres Using Dense Arrays of Smectic Liquid Crystal Edge Dislocations” ACS Nano 9, 11678-11689 (2015) DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.5b02538
  6. I. Gryn, E. Lacaze, R. Bartolino, B. Zappone “Controlling the self-assembly of periodic defect patterns in smectic liquid crystal films with electric fields“, Advanced Functional Materials, 25, 142-149, (2014) DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201402875
  7. D. Coursault, B. H. Ibrahim, L. Pelliser, B. Zappone, A. de Martino, E. Lacaze and B. Gallas “Modeling the optical properties of self-organized thin films of 8CB molecules” Optics Express, 22, 23182–23191, (2014) DOI: 10.1364/OE.22.023182
  8. Infusino M., De Luca A., Ciuchi F., Ionescu A., Scaramuzza N., Strangi G. Optical and electrical characterization of a gold nanoparticle dispersion in a chiral liquid crystal matrix J. Mat.Sci. 49, 4, 1805-1811, (2014) DOI 10.1007/s10853-013-7868-6
  9. Petriashvili G, De Santo MP, Chubinidze K, Hamdi R, Barberi R Visual micro-thermometers for nanoparticles photo-thermal conversion. Optics Express, 22, 14705-14711 DOI: 10.1364/OE.22.014705, (2014).
  10. Tone, C.M., De Santo, M.P., Ciuchi, F. The role of surface energy in guanosine nucleotide alignment: An intriguing scenario, Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 119, 99-105 (2014) DOI 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2014.04.
  11. Pucci D., Mendiguchia B.S., Tone C.M. , Szerb E.I., Ciuchi F. , Gao M. , Ghedini M., Crispini A. Unconventionally shaped chromonic liquid crystals formed by novel silver(i) complexes, J. Mater.Chem.C, 2014, 2, 8780 (2014) DOI: 10.1039/C4TC01736F
  12. Carbone, F., Sorriso-Valvo, L. Experimental analysis of intermittency in electrohydrodynamic instability EPJE 37, 61, pp. 1-11 (2014) DOI: 10.1140/epje/i2014-14061-x

Other Selected Publications:

  1. Hamdi R, Lombardo G, De Santo MP, Barberi R Biaxial coherence length In a nematic π-cell. EPJ E, vol. 36, N 115. DOI:1140/epje/i2013-13115-y (2013).
  2. Petriashvili G, Japaridze K, Devadze L, Zurabishvili C, Sepashvili N, Ponjavidze N, De Santo MP, Matranga MA, Hamdi R, Ciuchi F, Barberi R Paper like cholesteric interferential mirror. Optics Express, vol. 21, p. 20821-20830, DOI: 10.1364/OE.21.020821, (2013).
  3. Tone, C.M., De Santo, M.P., Buonomenna, M.G., Golemme, G., Ciuchi, F. Dynamical homeotropic and planar alignments of chromonic liquid crystals, Soft Matter 8, 8478-8482 (2012) DOI:10.1039/c2sm26021b
  4. Ruths and B. Zappone, ” Direct nanomechanical measurement of an anchoring transition in a nematic liquid crystal subject to hybrid anchoring conditions“, Langmuir 28, 8371-8383, (2012) DOI: 10.1021/la204746d
  5. D. Coursault, J. Grand, B. Zappone, H. Ayeb, G. Lévi, N. Félidj and E. Lacaze, “Linear self-assembly of nanoparticles within liquid crystal defect arrays“, Advanced Materials 24, 1461–1465, (2012) DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103791
  6. Mazzulla A, Petriashvili G, Matranga MA, De Santo MP, Barberi R Thermal and electrical laser tuning in liquid crystal blue phase I. Soft Matter, 8, 4882-4885, DOI: 10.1039/c2sm25197c (2012).
  7. B. Zappone, C. Meyer, L. Bruno and E. Lacaze, “Periodic lattices of frustrated focal conic defect domains in smectic liquid crystal films“, Soft Matter, 8, 4318–4326, (2012) DOI: 10.1039/c2sm07207f
  8. Carbone, F., Vecchio, A., Sorriso-Valvo, L. Spatio-temporal dynamics, patterns formation and turbulence in complex fluids due to electrohydrodynamics instabilities European Physical Journal E 34 (8), 75, (2011) DOI: 10.1140/epje/i2011-11075-x
  9. Carbone, F., Sorriso-Valvo, L., Versace, C., Strangi, G., Bartolino, R. Physical Review Letters Anisotropy of spatiotemporal decorrelation in electrohydrodynamic turbulence 106 (11), 114502 (2011) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.114502
  10. Ayeb H, Lombardo G, Ciuchi F, Hamdi R, Gharbi A, Durand G, Barberi R Surface order reconstruction in nematics. Phys. Lett., vol. 97, 104104. DOI:10.1063/1.3455885 (2010).

Latest News

  • Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

    Lecce, Italy, 2017 Wednesday July 19th 

    CNR NANOTEC @ Lecce, Aula Seminari – pal. G, Piano Terra

    Program – PDF

    Zeiss, as microscopy technology leader, provides the unique complete imaging solution ranging from light, confocal, electron, ion and Xray modalities with a complete and straightforward correlative workflow. An overview of different technologies will be presented with a special focus on X-Rray microscopy.

  • MCS 2017

    International Workshop on Micropropulsion and CubeSats

    Bari, Italy, 26 – 27 June 2017

    Program – MSC2017

    This narrow-field, invited-only meeting is the first attempt to bring together the Materials and Micropropulsion communities with a view to contribute to the development of the Global Materials and Micropropulsion Roadmap, and set such meetings to a regular basis.

  • Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Workshop annuale d’Istituto – II ed.

    Cetraro (CS), 3 -5 maggio 2017

    Il programma completo dell’evento – download

    La tre giorni dedicata ai risultati di ricerca conseguiti e alle strategie scientifiche da intraprendere nel prossimo futuro.

Materials

NANOTEC is engaged in various aspects of materials research for advanced applications. Research activities are focused on growth and synthesis with various physical and chemical methodologies (CVD, MOCVD, MBE, PVD, PECVD, self-assembling, sol-gel, etc); based on fundamental research, we elucidate principles underpinning processing-structure-property relationships in functional materials and nanomaterials both inorganic and organic, and their hybrids and nanocomposites, with interesting electronic, magnetic, optical, mechanical or catalytic properties; we exploit those relationships to introduce new functionalities in materials science and build a basis for “predicting” new materials based on the established principles. Topics covered include III-V semiconductors, Si-based alloys, organic semiconductors, dielectrics, piezoelectrics, ferroelectrics, nanomaterials, graphene, 2D-materials, nanocomposites, colloidal nanocrystals, non-crystalline solids, self-assembled monolayers and functional surfaces. Through these efforts, NANOTEC aims to create advanced materials that contribute to society functional innovations.

Inorganic Semiconductors

Our objective here at CNR-Nanotec is the development of new semiconducting materials and nanostructures representing the foundation of more efficient, high performance, low power consumption optoelectronics…

Organic Materials

Organic materials π-conjugated with photo- and electroactive properties have a crucial role in field of organic electronics including applications such as organic solar cells (OSC), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs)…

Graphene & Other 2D- Materials

The work on Graphene and related 2D layered materials in the Apulian Graphene Lab at CNR-NANOTEC institute is addressed minly to the development of methodologies of Production and Material Processing. We also develop simple devices…

multifunctional-oxides-smart-coatingsr

Multifunctional Oxides & Smart Coatings

A wide range of metal-oxides exhibit intriguing properties and multiple functionalities. These materials are the subject of many experimental and theoretical studies, since they have found broad applications…

nanostructures-self-assemblingr

Nanostructures & Self-Assembling

Nanomaterials are coming into use in healthcare, electronics, cosmetics, catalysis and other areas, because they bring novel  mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical, electrochemical, catalytic properties…

Colloidal Inorganic NanocrystalsR360

Colloidal Inorganic Nanocrystals

Colloidal Inorganic Nanocrystals otherwise known as ‘artificial atoms’ because the density of their electronic states, which controls many physical properties, can be regularly tuned by maneuvering the chemical composition…

Complex and anisotropic fluids

Liquid crystals are versatile materials, with outstanding anisotropic properties which can be a model for turbulence, a guide for the self assembling of nanoparticles or quantum dots…

Latest News

Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

Lecce, Italy, 2017 Wednesday July 19th 

CNR NANOTEC @ Lecce, Aula Seminari – pal. G, Piano Terra

Program - PDF

Zeiss, as microscopy technology leader, provides the unique complete imaging solution ranging from light, confocal, electron, ion and Xray modalities with a complete and straightforward correlative workflow. An overview of different technologies will be presented with a special focus on X-Rray microscopy.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

MCS 2017

International Workshop on Micropropulsion and CubeSats

Bari, Italy, 26 - 27 June 2017

Program - MSC2017

This narrow-field, invited-only meeting is the first attempt to bring together the Materials and Micropropulsion communities with a view to contribute to the development of the Global Materials and Micropropulsion Roadmap, and set such meetings to a regular basis.

Workshop annuale d'Istituto - II ed.

Workshop annuale d'Istituto - II ed.

Cetraro (CS), 3 -5 maggio 2017

Il programma completo dell'evento - download

La tre giorni dedicata ai risultati di ricerca conseguiti e alle strategie scientifiche da intraprendere nel prossimo futuro.

EL.PHO

The expansive growth of electronics based on inorganic, organic and hybrid materials has lead to the development of a number of significant applications, ranging from low-cost photovoltaics (OPV), electronic paper, and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and sensors. Recently, a considerable interest is developing around wearable optical devices. For instance, flexible OLEDs are now being integrated into flexible or textile based displays. Wearable optical sensors can track multiple vital signs such as heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen levels. Other applications for wearables include UV detection, measuring pollutant levels, explosive detection, both indoors and outdoors. Our main focus is on the realization and characterization of several types of sensors and optoelectronic devices on substrates of different nature and their combination with other components to realize smart systems. We address the new fabrication challenges, such as the diverse nature of material properties due to low temperature processing; the study of device performances that depend on the proper detection and measurements of a multitude of electro-optical signals. These research activities are carried out in collaboration with CNR-IMM in Lecce.

Charge injection, trapping and mobility properties

In order to develop highly efficient optoelectronic devices, based on inorganic, organic or hybrid semiconductors, the understanding of the charge transport mechanism, in these classes of materials, is of fundamental importance. However, the small values of charge carrier mobility, which limit the applicability of standard techniques normally used for inorganic semiconductors such as the Hall Effect, have made the study of charge transport mechanism in hybrid and organic materials very challenging. Nowadays, it is clear that only by combining different methods of investigation it is possible to achieve a full understanding of the charge carrier properties.

We apply Time of Flight (TOF), Extraction of equilibrium charge carriers by Linearly Increasing Voltage (CELIV), Space charge limited current (SCLC) techniques to study charge injection, trapping and mobility properties of both high and low conductive materials.

Spatial photo-response of materials and devices

Photocurrent mapping is a valuable tool to directly probe light absorption, as well as transport and collection of the photogenerated charges down to the micrometer scale. The possibility to change the excitation wavelength greatly widens the range of materials which can be analysed, also enabling spectral investigations. So far, the technique has been applied to GaAs Nanowires, GaN Schottky diodes, MEMS structures, GaAs based Varactors, etc.

The Pockels effect is exploited to unveil the internal electric field distribution in radiation detectors based on CdTe and GaAs, without perturbing it. When applied in conjunction with TOF, it provides the remarkable advantage to access both fixed and free charges.

spatial

Integrated Optical Sources

Optical microcavities play a key role for the development of novel optoelectronic devices. The aim of this research activity is to realize and characterize organic/hybrid based microcavities.

integrated

Advanced Materials

We study a wide range of materials ranging from inorganic, hybrid, or organic semiconductors to conductive oxides. These latter ones, Transparent Conductive Electrodes (TCEs), which transmit light and conduct electrical current simultaneously, mostly in the visible spectral range, are of increasing importance for information (displays) and energy (photovoltaics, architectural and window glass) technologies. Our main focus is on the realization and characterization of TCEs, using a wide range of depositions techniques from thermal evaporation, e-beam, R.F. Sputtering to solution cast methods.

An extensive morphological, optical and electrical characterization is also performed in order to investigate the degree of roughness, uniformity and transmittance of the films while keeping suitable conductive properties.

advanced

Radiation Detectors

Novel NIR Photodetectors based on GaAs Heterostructures exhibiting fast response and high responsivity have been realized and tested. In the proposed devices the presence of 2DEG and/or 2DHG greatly improve the time response down to few ps. Structures based on low-Temperature grown GaAs, Bragg reflectors, and different contacts are investigated. Among the advantages of these devices is the possibility of monolithic incorporation into integrated circuits, creating detector and receiver circuity on a single chip.

radiation

Facilities & Labs

ELPHO Lab

People

termineRoberto

Termine

CNR Researcher

Attilio_GolemmeAttilio

Golemme

Associate Professor

SalvatoreGambinoSalvatore

Gambino

Associate Researcher

Publications

  1. J. Pousset, I. Farella, S. Gambino, A. Cola, “Subgap time of flight: A spectroscopic study of deep levels in semi-insulating CdTe:Cl”, J. Appl. Phys. 119, 105701 (2016), ISSN: 00218979, DOI: 10.1063/1.4943262.
  2. S. Gambino, A. Genco, G. Accorsi, O. Di Stefano., S. Savasta, S. Patanè, G. Gigli, M. Mazzeo, “Ultrastrong light-matter coupling in electroluminescent organic microcavities”, Applied Materials Today 1, pp. 33–36, (2015), ISSN: 23529407, DOI: 10.1016/j.apmt.2015.08.003.
  3. S. Gambino, M. Mazzeo, A. Genco, O. Di Stefano, S. Savasta, S. Patanè, D. Ballarini, F. Mangione, G. Lerario, D. Sanvitto, G. Gigli, “Exploring Light–Matter Interaction Phenomena under Ultrastrong Coupling Regime”, ACS Photonics, 1 (10), pp. 1042–1048 (2014), ISSN: 2330-4022, DOI: 10.1021/ph500266d
  4. S. Gambino, S.-C. Lo, Z. Liu, P. Burn, I.D.W. Samuel, “Charge transport in a highly phosphorescent iridium(III) complex-cored dendrimer with double dendrons”, Adv. Funct. Mater. 22, 157-165, (2012), ISSN: 1616-3028, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201101727. 

Other selected Publications

  1. S. Gambino, S.G. Stevenson, K.A. Knights, P.L. Burn, I.D.W. Samuel, “Control of charge transport in iridium(III) complex-cored carbazole dendrimers by generation and structural modification”, Adv. Funct. Mater. 19, 317-323, (2009), ISSN: 1616-3028, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200801144.

Project

MAAT: Molecular NAnotechnology for HeAlth and EnvironmenT (PON R&C 2007-2013 ), (2012-2015).

FT_WOLED: Flexible Transparent White Organic Light Emitting Device, Executive Programme for scientific and technological cooperation between Italy and China – research area “Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials” , (2013-2015).

CE2: Center of Entrepreneurial Engineering (PONa3_00354), (2011-2015)

Latest News

Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Zeiss Microscopy Technology and Complete Correlative Workflow

Lecce, Italy, 2017 Wednesday July 19th 

CNR NANOTEC @ Lecce, Aula Seminari – pal. G, Piano Terra

Program - PDF

Zeiss, as microscopy technology leader, provides the unique complete imaging solution ranging from light, confocal, electron, ion and Xray modalities with a complete and straightforward correlative workflow. An overview of different technologies will be presented with a special focus on X-Rray microscopy.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

MCS 2017

International Workshop on Micropropulsion and CubeSats

Bari, Italy, 26 - 27 June 2017

Program - MSC2017

This narrow-field, invited-only meeting is the first attempt to bring together the Materials and Micropropulsion communities with a view to contribute to the development of the Global Materials and Micropropulsion Roadmap, and set such meetings to a regular basis.

Workshop annuale d'Istituto - II ed.

Workshop annuale d'Istituto - II ed.

Cetraro (CS), 3 -5 maggio 2017

Il programma completo dell'evento - download

La tre giorni dedicata ai risultati di ricerca conseguiti e alle strategie scientifiche da intraprendere nel prossimo futuro.