Plasma Physics and Technologies

This research area deals with theoretical modelling, experimental applications and diagnostics of plasma.
Elementary Processes in Plasmas are studied by accurate theoretical methods, relating to different classes of processes relevant to many technological fields, from thermonuclear controlled fusion (negative ion sources, divertor region in tokamak), to aerospace (re)entry conditions and astro-chemistry. Thermodynamic and transport properties in equilibrium plasmas have been calculated for complex gas mixtures, of different atmospheres (Earth, Mars and Jupiter). Space Plasmas are typically in very extreme conditions, from very low to very high density: this is the case of dusty plasmas, which deals with the dynamics of dust above airless body surfaces, rings and planet formation. Electric thrusters (Hall-effect and helicon discharges) and plasma-assisted combustion (SCRAMJET) are important for space transportation (satellite guidance, orbit transfer and deep space exploration).
The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of Laser Induced Plasma in different environments by spectroscopic techniques gives the required knowledge useful for a wide range of application fields (e.g. chemical analysis applied to environment, cultural heritage, space, material processing). Theoretical investigations have been also dedicated to verify the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), commonly considered for calibration-free LIBS.
Plasma sources based on discharges created by direct current, capacitively coupled radiofrequency, inductively coupled radiofrequency and microwaves are characterized by thermal non-equilibrium condition and are modelled by kinetic approaches: polynomial expansion, state-to-state and particle-based (Particle-in-Cell, Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics) methods. These plasmas are studied from an experimental point of view, employing different optical techniques for Advanced Non-Equilibrium Plasma Diagnostics.
In particular Microwave Plasmas are employed successfully for the growth of undoped nanocrystalline (NCD) and polycrystalline diamond (PCD) films, deposited by a microwave PECVD (MWPECVD) technique starting from gas mixtures of CH4 highly diluted (less than 5%) in Ar and H2, respectively.
Plasma surface engineering includes a large area of processes aimed to drastically change the surface properties of materials preserving the bulk ones. The processes can be performed by using both low and atmospheric pressure plasmas, in both direct and remote approach, injecting the film precursors in gas, vapor and aerosol form.

Plasma technologies for materials & surfaces

Plasma surface engineering embraces a large range of processes aimed to drastically change the surface properties of materials preserving the bulk ones. This includes for instance corrosion protective coatings…

Latest News

  • Scholar-in-Training Award dell’AACR a Marta Cavo

    Lecce, 15/01/2020
    Marta Cavo, ERC-postdoctoral research fellow at the CNR Institute of Nanotechnology in Lecce (ERC-StG INTERCELLMED No., 759959, PI: Dr. Loretta L. del Mercato), have been selected to receive a Scholar-in-Training Award (USD $625). The Scholarship will support her attendance at the Conference on The Evolving Landscape of Cancer Modeling, organized by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), to be held on 2-5 March 2020 in San Diego (California), where she will present the work “Quantifying stroma-tumor cell interactions in three-dimensional cell culture systems”. (more…)
  • I° meeting TecnoMed Puglia

    Lecce, 05 dicembre 2019 – Aula Rita Levi Montalcini – CNR NANOTEC Lecce

    Si terrà domani, giovedì 05 dicembre, con inizio alle ore 14.00 presso l’aula Rita Levi Montalcini del Cnr Nanotec, il “I° meeting TecnoMed Puglia: Tecnopolo per la medicina di precisione“. Il meeting mira a fare il punto sulle attività programmate, sullo stato di avanzamento e sugli highlights.

    Puoi scaricare la locandina da qui

  • Jam session Nanotec… note di scienza su scala nanometrica

    Lecce, 27 settembre 2019 – ex monastero degli Olivetani “CAR-T: l’alba di una nuova era”  con: Attilio Guarini (IRCCS Istituto Tumori “Giovanni Paolo II” di Bari)  introduce e modera: Marco Ferrazzoli (Ufficio Stampa CNR Roma) a cura di: Gabriella Zammillo 

    Le CAR-T (Chimeric Antigens Receptor Cells-T) sono cellule modificate in laboratorio a partire dai linfociti T. Rappresentano una nuova strategia di cura che sfrutta il sistema immunitario per combattere alcuni tipi di tumore come linfomi aggressivi a grandi cellule e leucemie linfoblastiche acute a cellule B. Il prof Attilio Guarini, ematologo all’Istituto tumori Giovanni Paolo II di Bari, le definisce la “vis sanatrix naturae della antica medicina salernitana”, trattandosi del potenziamento dell’attività citotossica dei linfociti del paziente opportunamente ingegnerizzati per riconoscere e contrastare alcuni tipi di cellule tumorali.

    (more…)